September 2018

Vegetable Protein

protein

I’m continuing this month on the topic of protein, one of the magical macronutrients that your body needs protein for growth, repair, & maintenance of body tissues — muscles, blood, bones & hormones, including immune system function, energy production when blood sugar is low, metabolic & digestive enzymes, and hair, skin, nails, collagen, & elastin production.

Last blog post, I spoke about complete protein and how to get it by consuming grass-fed, pasture raised, and wild-caught animals and fish. But as we all know, not everyone eats meat or fish.

Luckily, starchy and non-starchy vegetables also offer protein. The tricky part is that the majority aren’t complete proteins because they don’t contain the full amino acid profile. Not to fret, there are combinations to make them become complete proteins.

These must be properly combined to be complete …

  • beans with grains

  • beans with nuts or seeds

  • milk products with grains

Beans/Legumes + Grain Ideas …

  • garbanzo beans or black beans + quinoa

  • garbanzo beans + tahini = hummus

  • kidney beans in salad, sprinkled with sunflower seeds

  • pinto or black beans with + rice

  • lentils + rice

Nuts & Seeds + Grains or Beans/Legumes

  • cooked gf oats with walnuts, sprinkled with chia or ground flax

  • brown rice with black sesame seeds or shaved almonds

  • basil pesto with pine nuts OR cilantro pesto with pumpkins seeds over brown rice, brown rice pasta or tempeh

  • hemp seeds + gf grains and/beans

Healthy tip: You can eat them separately within a 36 hour period for them to still work in the body as complete protein.

Who says that you can ‘t find a vegetable that isn’t a complete protein?

Microalgae like chlorella & spirulina are highly absorbable, high in protein, beta-carotene, EFA’s & minerals. Refreshing & vital!

Bee pollen gives you energy, is a nutritive tonic, builds blood, decreases allergies

Nutritional yeast is full of fiber, B vitamins & chromium. Stimulates metabolism. No more than 2 tbsp. a day.

Check out those three superfood boosters that you should add to your repertoire now…

Animal Protein

sardines

what is protein?

Protein gives your body the structure and raw materials to anchor itself to the earth.

Your body needs protein for growth, repair, & maintenance of body tissues — muscles, blood, bones & hormones, including immune system function, energy production when blood sugar is low, metabolic & digestive enzymes, and hair, skin, nails, collagen, & elastin production.

Proteins are made up of individual building blocks called amino acids. These nutrients can be classified into three main categories: essential, nonessential and conditional amino acids. Nine of them are called essential because they can't be made by the human body and must be obtained from food.

A “complete protein” from sources like organic eggs and dairy products, fish, beef, and poultry contain all 9 essential amino acids.

When choosing animal meat, choose pastured or wild animals. Not only are they much leaner than their conventional counterpart but they are also higher in key nutrients, including antioxidants, vitamins (A, D & K2), and a beneficial fat called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) that's been tied to improved immunity and anti-inflammation benefits. Plus, these animals are sustainably fed and in healthy ecological conditions.

Choose grass fed beef, organic, free-range poultry, pork, pastured dairy like cottage cheese, ricotta cheese, ghee, yogurt and kefir, undenatured whey protein powder.

Choose free-range, organically grown animals as the inherent energy of the animal combines with the vibration of the quality of the animal’s life. These animals are good at staying in the moment and living according to their instinctual selves. As we gratefully eat animal products, their energy is transferred into us and we feel more nourished and grounded.

Seafood is best when it is wild-caught, cold-water and oily fish like cod, halibut, herring, mackerel, wild salmon, sardines, and anchovies.

Farmed seafood on the other hand typically contains hormones, heavy metals, and toxins. The essential fatty acid ratios also change in farmed seafood then in wild seafood.

Food grown organically and sustainably will have a harmonizing effect on our energy because there were thoughtful and respectful ways that were brought in the cultivation of the food.

Protein -- the what, why and how

protein

what is protein?

Protein gives your body the structure and raw materials to anchor itself to the earth. Proteins are made up of individual building blocks called amino acids. A “complete protein” from sources like organic eggs and dairy products, fish, beef, and poultry contain all 8 essential amino acids. Your body needs protein for growth, repair, & maintenance of body tissues — muscles, blood, bones & hormones. Including:

  • Immune system function

  • Energy production when blood sugar is low

  • Metabolic & digestive enzymes

  • Hair, skin, nails, collagen, & elastin

signs of deficiency

  • Loss of muscle tone

  • Confusion

  • Slow wound healing

  • Irritability

  • Low libido

  • Food cravings

  • Too acid or alkaline

  • Fluid retention

  • Fatigue

  • Muscle weakness

  • Thin hair

  • Weak nails

  • Weight loss

signs of excess

  • Acidosis or dehydration

  • Constipation

  • Putrefaction in the gut if stomach acid is inadequate

  • Loss of bone

  • Muscoskeletal issues

  • Kidney dysfunction

  • Ammonia in the blood

How do I know how much protein I should have daily?

Here is a simple formula that helps you determine how much protein you should have daily.

1. weight in pounds divided by 2.2 = weight in kg

2. weight in kg x 0.8 -1.8 g/kg = protein in grams

Example: 145 pound woman who exercises moderately every week.

1. 145/2.2= 65.90 kg

2. 65.90 kg x 1.3 = 85.67 protein in grams daily

Sedentary adults should get 0.8 g of protein per kilogram of body weight, while endurance runners and strength training athletes need up to 1.4 or 1.8 grams of protein per kilogram, respectively. Also, if you are pregnant or recovering from an injury, protein intake should also be increased.

Now, the ability to digest, assimilate, and absorb the amino acids and nutrients from the protein in order to build, heal, and recover the stomach will need adequate amounts of hydrochloric acid (HCL), AKA stomach acid.

Hydrochloric acid (HCL) activates pepsin enzymes to break down protein. A simple way to produce HCL is to chew slowly and thoroughly. If needed, take a digestive enzyme with HCL like this Pure Encapsulations brand, that I recommend to all of my clients.

Check out my next blog post about getting healthy and lean protein from animal products. And stay tuned for vegetable protein next …